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Postcolonial Networks brings together scholars, activists, and leaders with the urgency of a movement to foster decolonized relationships, innovative scholarship, and social transformation.

Monthly Archives: December 2012

Rhoda Zuk on Yatta Kanu’s Curriculum As Cultural Practice.

December 31st, 2012|

This collection of essays was reprinted three years after its original publication in 2006. It is easy to see why: the book is an eminently useful introduction to postcolonial theory and its possible applications to the practice of teaching. Texts central to postcolonial theory are elaborated upon through descriptions of diverse teaching practices in a range of disciplines. Having said this, some contributions are overly general, asserting rather than demonstrating the urgent need for teachers to shape their work in accordance with postcolonial insights. This review highlights five essays that are painstakingly researched and argued and that offer a careful and exciting education in the field of postcolonial theory and teaching.

Annie Tinsley on Jane Lydon & Uzma Z. Rizvi’s Handbook of Postcolonial Archaeology (Walnut Creek, California: Left Coast Press, Inc. 2010).

December 22nd, 2012|

"Studies in postcolonialism serve as the impetus for the formation of Handbook of Postcolonial Archaeology. Against the grain of traditional handbooks this book is presented as short chapters offering new ways of thinking."

On the Disciplining of Grief: The Affective Aftermath of Newtown

December 20th, 2012|

"Can we come to face ourselves in others and others in ourselves? Let us work to grieve in ways that won’t solidify exclusions on which violent tragedies rely in the first place."

Invisibility and Silence

December 16th, 2012|

"As a part-Native person with a “legitimate” claim to ancestry, this series of questions struck a chord with me. I don’t have a voice. I am either assumed to be white, or discredited because I am only part-Native. I don’t fit; I don’t have a voice."

A Graduate Student’s Top Five Picks: Joseph N. Goh

December 9th, 2012|

"Postcolonial critiques and recastings of theological themes are not theologoumenonic fads, but critiques and transformations of colonising methodologies and epistemologies in theology . . ."

Jørgen Skov Sørensen asks, Is there a postcolonial mission without a postcolonial theology…?

December 5th, 2012|

Is there a postcolonial mission without a postcolonial theology…?
Dana L. Robert. Christian Mission: How Christianity became a World Religion. Blackwell Brief Histories of Religion Series. Malden and Oxford:Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Ogbu U. Kalu, Peter Vethanayagamony and Edmund Kee-Fook Chia (eds.). Mission after Christendom: Emergent Themes in Contemporary Mission. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2010.
Marion Grau. Rethinking Mission […]

Three Poems: Christmas List, Weekend Instructions, & Letter to India

December 3rd, 2012|

"I hope you will be proud to tell people That you knew me when I was hungry And you were my world. After all, it is you who always said that love in whatever way it comes is flawless"