Our Mission

Postcolonial Networks brings together scholars, activists, and leaders with the urgency of a movement to foster decolonized relationships, innovative scholarship, and social transformation.

Jason Craige Harris

About Jason Craige Harris

Jason Craige Harris is a third-year master's candidate in Black Religion in the African Diaspora and a Marquand merit scholar at Yale Divinity School, where he was recently awarded the Mary Cady Tew Prize for exceptional ability in history and ethics. He earned a bachelor’s in religion and African-American studies from Wesleyan University and received the Giffin Prize for excellence in the Study of Religion, Spurrier Award for ethics, and an official citation for academic excellence issued by the 2009 Connecticut General Assembly. As a fellow at Wesleyan’s Center for the Humanities and a recipient of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, Harris wrote a senior honors thesis analyzing theological anthropologies along political and racial fault lines in U.S. Evangelical history. His research and writing are principally concerned with black life, Christianity, (post)colonialism, violence, feminisms, critical social theory, and ultimately planetary flourishing. Concerns arising from the academic study of Africana religion, philosophy, and ethics particularly inform his inquiries. Through an interdisciplinary framework, he probes the systems of values that undergird dominant epistemological, rhetorical, cultural, and religious forms to determine to what extent, if at all, they conduce to robust conceptions of justice. With an eye toward contemporary social problems, he considers the religious strategies and visions that historically marginalized peoples have created to respond to conditions of living and being delimited by restrictive understandings of race, gender, religion, and nation. He is a general editor at the Journal of Postcolonial Networks, where, among other things, he helps to facilitate conversations on race and postcolonial/liberation theologies. As a Christian minister and budding public intellectual, Harris seeks and invites others into more holistic and attuned, less violent and constrained, ways of narrating the self and the divine. Areas of Interest and Research:

 African American Religious Studies
 Africana Philosophy African American Moral, Social, and Political Thought African American Intellectual History Liberation and Postcolonial (Christian) Thought
 Philosophies of Liberation Contemporary Religious Thought Race, Gender, and American Christianities
 Evangelicalisms and Pentecostalisms Histories of Race Discourse in the Americas (Christian) Social Ethics
 Critical Social Theory/Social Philosophy Theories of Race, Gender, and Power Method and Theory in the Study of Religion He is deeply committed to a praxis in which dualities of mind/heart, mind/body, and emotions/thought are consistently challenged and replaced with integrated models of selfhood that cherish self-multiplicity - the point at which the postcolonial becomes self-consciously embodied. He also enjoy taking walks in the coolness of the day, singing, laughing, and writing poetically and theoretically on his lived experience, whatever helps to bring more beauty and justice into the world.

Review of Jeanne Choy Tate’s Something Greater: Culture, Family, and Community as Living Story Pickwick Publications, 2013. Paperpack, $18.00.

October 28th, 2014|

Tocqueville believed an individualism that leads people to be "shut up in the solitude of his own heart” could be detrimental to communal life and may even threaten democracy itself.

Upcoming Courageous Dialogue | Multiple faiths in post-colonial cities: living together after Empire

October 7th, 2014|

This upcoming courageous dialogue is scheduled for May 6-8, 2016 at the University of Manchester in Manchester, England. Call for papers is in effect: 250 word abstracts are due March 1, 2015.

Palgrave Series Publication: Indigenous Australia and the Unfinished Business of Theology: Cross-Cultural Engagement

September 7th, 2014|

The book begins by drawing attention to the ongoing colonization of Australia, and to the rich wisdoms of Indigenous Australians which non-Indigenous people have not begun to respect, learn and appreciate.

Recommended Books: Evangelical Postcolonial Conversations: Global Awakenings in Theology and Praxis

September 1st, 2014|

Colonialism involves more than just territorial domination. It also creates cultural space that silences and disenfranchises those who do not hold power. This process of subjugation continues today in various forms of neocolonialism, such as globalization.

Pamphletarian Theology with Cláudio Carvalhaes | Interview with Justo L. Gonzalez

August 25th, 2014|

Watch these exciting clips from Cláudio Carvalhaes' interview with Justo L. Gonzalez, a preeminent Latin@ theologian…

Listen and See What Happens: The Power of American Indian Stories

August 25th, 2014|

"When we try to tell our story to someone who is different from us, we are faced not only with all of our own baggage, but also the misconceptions and prejudices and even ill will, perceived and real, conscious and unconscious, of the listener."

Pamphletarian Theology with Cláudio Carvalhaes | Slam Poetry and Theology

May 11th, 2014|

"Like Prophet Gentileza, as a Christian social-eeconomic-cultural-religious actor, I have responsibilities with our ways of living. So my eye, ear, mouth, hands and body will try to be with, or near to the poor."