Our Mission

Postcolonial Networks brings together scholars, activists, and leaders with the urgency of a movement to foster decolonized relationships, innovative scholarship, and social transformation.

Jason Craige Harris

About Jason Craige Harris

Jason Craige Harris is a third-year master's candidate in Black Religion in the African Diaspora and a Marquand merit scholar at Yale Divinity School, where he was recently awarded the Mary Cady Tew Prize for exceptional ability in history and ethics. He earned a bachelor’s in religion and African-American studies from Wesleyan University and received the Giffin Prize for excellence in the Study of Religion, Spurrier Award for ethics, and an official citation for academic excellence issued by the 2009 Connecticut General Assembly. As a fellow at Wesleyan’s Center for the Humanities and a recipient of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, Harris wrote a senior honors thesis analyzing theological anthropologies along political and racial fault lines in U.S. Evangelical history. His research and writing are principally concerned with black life, Christianity, (post)colonialism, violence, feminisms, critical social theory, and ultimately planetary flourishing. Concerns arising from the academic study of Africana religion, philosophy, and ethics particularly inform his inquiries. Through an interdisciplinary framework, he probes the systems of values that undergird dominant epistemological, rhetorical, cultural, and religious forms to determine to what extent, if at all, they conduce to robust conceptions of justice. With an eye toward contemporary social problems, he considers the religious strategies and visions that historically marginalized peoples have created to respond to conditions of living and being delimited by restrictive understandings of race, gender, religion, and nation. He is a general editor at the Journal of Postcolonial Networks, where, among other things, he helps to facilitate conversations on race and postcolonial/liberation theologies. As a Christian minister and budding public intellectual, Harris seeks and invites others into more holistic and attuned, less violent and constrained, ways of narrating the self and the divine. Areas of Interest and Research:

 African American Religious Studies
 Africana Philosophy African American Moral, Social, and Political Thought African American Intellectual History Liberation and Postcolonial (Christian) Thought
 Philosophies of Liberation Contemporary Religious Thought Race, Gender, and American Christianities
 Evangelicalisms and Pentecostalisms Histories of Race Discourse in the Americas (Christian) Social Ethics
 Critical Social Theory/Social Philosophy Theories of Race, Gender, and Power Method and Theory in the Study of Religion He is deeply committed to a praxis in which dualities of mind/heart, mind/body, and emotions/thought are consistently challenged and replaced with integrated models of selfhood that cherish self-multiplicity - the point at which the postcolonial becomes self-consciously embodied. He also enjoy taking walks in the coolness of the day, singing, laughing, and writing poetically and theoretically on his lived experience, whatever helps to bring more beauty and justice into the world.

Faith-based Organizing and the Prison Industrial Complex: An Interview with Laura Markle Downton

February 11th, 2014|

"Our collective healing becomes possible as we take up the struggle together, name our history with honesty, and work to ensure that we break with cycles of trauma and oppression rather than repeat them."

A Christian Theology of Homelessness—A Liberationist Take

February 6th, 2014|

"God is with those for whom society has made no home; society may push out Mr. Ashton but the Divine has made room for the discredited, dehumanized, denied, and disenfranchised."

A Conversation on Rage

February 2nd, 2014|

"Shul’s story provokes me to ask who is the patient equivalent at our postcolonial intersections? Whose rage is not being heard and requires the unexpected, unplanned intervention comparable to Rabbi Izen’s?"

A PN Book Project: Evangelical Postcolonial Conversations (July 2014)

February 2nd, 2014|

Evangelical Postcolonial Conversations: Global Awakening in Theology and Praxis, a product of the Postcolonial Roundtable led by Postcolonial Networks, is forthcoming with InterVarsity Press Academic.

Mrinalini Sebastian on Gayatri Spivak’s “Can the Subaltern Speak?”

January 29th, 2014|

Listen to our resident teacher, Mrinalini Sebastian, discuss Gayatri Spivak's famous, though not always understood, "Can the Subaltern Speak?" Join the conversation today with your questions and comments!

Eighth Monday: Pamphletarian Theology with Cláudio Carvalhaes

January 28th, 2014|

"Like Prophet Gentileza, as a Christian social-eeconomic-cultural-religious actor, I have responsibilities with our ways of living. So my eye, ear, mouth, hands and body will try to be with, or near to the poor."

Seventh Monday: Pamphletarian Theology with Cláudio Carvalhaes

January 13th, 2014|

"The Landless Movement is the world largest social movement with more than 500.000 members and is connected with the Via Campesina. The movement proposes a new possible world, fight for agrarian reform and fights against agribusiness. "