Our Mission

Postcolonial Networks brings together scholars, activists, and leaders with the urgency of a movement to foster decolonized relationships, innovative scholarship, and social transformation.

Postcolonial Networks Board

Jason Craige Harris

About Jason Craige Harris

Jason Craige Harris is a third-year master's candidate in Black Religion in the African Diaspora and a Marquand merit scholar at Yale Divinity School, where he was recently awarded the Mary Cady Tew Prize for exceptional ability in history and ethics. He earned a bachelor’s in religion and African-American studies from Wesleyan University and received the Giffin Prize for excellence in the Study of Religion, Spurrier Award for ethics, and an official citation for academic excellence issued by the 2009 Connecticut General Assembly. As a fellow at Wesleyan’s Center for the Humanities and a recipient of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, Harris wrote a senior honors thesis analyzing theological anthropologies along political and racial fault lines in U.S. Evangelical history. His research and writing are principally concerned with black life, Christianity, (post)colonialism, violence, feminisms, critical social theory, and ultimately planetary flourishing. Concerns arising from the academic study of Africana religion, philosophy, and ethics particularly inform his inquiries. Through an interdisciplinary framework, he probes the systems of values that undergird dominant epistemological, rhetorical, cultural, and religious forms to determine to what extent, if at all, they conduce to robust conceptions of justice. With an eye toward contemporary social problems, he considers the religious strategies and visions that historically marginalized peoples have created to respond to conditions of living and being delimited by restrictive understandings of race, gender, religion, and nation. He is a general editor at the Journal of Postcolonial Networks, where, among other things, he helps to facilitate conversations on race and postcolonial/liberation theologies. As a Christian minister and budding public intellectual, Harris seeks and invites others into more holistic and attuned, less violent and constrained, ways of narrating the self and the divine. Areas of Interest and Research:

 African American Religious Studies
 Africana Philosophy African American Moral, Social, and Political Thought African American Intellectual History Liberation and Postcolonial (Christian) Thought
 Philosophies of Liberation Contemporary Religious Thought Race, Gender, and American Christianities
 Evangelicalisms and Pentecostalisms Histories of Race Discourse in the Americas (Christian) Social Ethics
 Critical Social Theory/Social Philosophy Theories of Race, Gender, and Power Method and Theory in the Study of Religion He is deeply committed to a praxis in which dualities of mind/heart, mind/body, and emotions/thought are consistently challenged and replaced with integrated models of selfhood that cherish self-multiplicity - the point at which the postcolonial becomes self-consciously embodied. He also enjoy taking walks in the coolness of the day, singing, laughing, and writing poetically and theoretically on his lived experience, whatever helps to bring more beauty and justice into the world.

Listening to the World: The Need for Postcolonial Literature in the Secondary Classroom

January 6th, 2014|

"If we start teaching information that has very little context for learners in the United States, we as educators focus on difference and can end up “othering” an entire nation, the most significant pitfall of teaching postcolonial texts."

Sixth Monday: Pamphletarian Theology with Cláudio Carvalhaes

January 6th, 2014|

"The hope here is that these doings, these pamphlets, in forms of actions, movements, words, books, art, performances, images, dreams, hopes and imagination, will gain some social ripple effects that might help us ..."

A Sermon: Light, Spirit and Power of God: Good News for All Humanity

January 3rd, 2014|

"Humanity rewrote the scriptures and redirected God’s love of all to the love of a few. Colonizers questioned the humanity of some peoples. Conversion began with a process of civilization."

Fifth Monday: Pamphletarian Theology with Cláudio Carvalhaes

December 16th, 2013|

"A pamphlet is a piece of paper, from one to 4 pages, that can be folded, holding short position on something with just enough information to spur some action."

Fourth Monday: Pamphletarian Theology with Cláudio Carvalhaes

December 8th, 2013|

"Like Prophet Gentileza, as a Christian social-eeconomic-cultural-religious actor, I have responsibilities with our ways of living. So my eye, ear, mouth, hands and body will try to be with, or near to the poor."

Remembering José Esteban Muñoz

December 8th, 2013|

"I encountered the work of José Esteban Muñoz early in my work, as I was searching for the voices of queer of color cultural critique to influence my own pursuits within decolonized liberation theologies."

Keeping the Match Lit for a Queer Future: Remembering José Estaban Muñoz

December 8th, 2013|

"The absence of his voice is a great loss. The coverage, perspective, and sheer inspiration of thought must be taken up as a charge for the next generation. His work must now live on in others."