Our Mission

Postcolonial Networks brings together scholars, activists, and leaders with the urgency of a movement to foster decolonized relationships, innovative scholarship, and social transformation.

British South Asian Cinema and the Presence of History

February 28th, 2011|

A couple of years ago, when I defended the proposal for my dissertation on British South Asian cinema, one of the questions that came up was, why British South Asian cinema? In a field where people often assume that your area of academic specialization will relate strongly to your own background in some very personal, but compelling way, those present at this defense understood my academic interests at two levels. They instinctively understood my interest in postcolonial cinema (I am, after all, an English-speaking South Asian), and in diasporic South Asian-American cinema (because here I am, a South Asian studying at an American university, living far, far away from her family and home).

Response to a reader’s criticisms of “The Egyptian Revolution through a Literary Lens”

February 27th, 2011|

Response to a reader’s criticisms of “The Egyptian Revolution through a Literary Lens”

The reader is correct to a certain extent:  revolution involves hard political work, and reading novels does not make for revolution alone–and some postcolonial theory fails to address revolution in any meaningful way.  But I think the reader must have quickly perused my […]

Response to a reader's criticisms of "The Egyptian Revolution through a Literary Lens"

February 27th, 2011|

Response to a reader’s criticisms of “The Egyptian Revolution through a Literary Lens”

The reader is correct to a certain extent:  revolution involves hard political work, and reading novels does not make for revolution alone–and some postcolonial theory fails to address revolution in any meaningful way.  But I think the reader must have quickly perused my […]

The Egyptian Revolution Through a Literary Lens

February 26th, 2011|

The Egyptian Revolution through a Literary Lens

This winter, as protests against Hosni Mubarak escalated in Tahrir Square, commentators from across the political spectrum began to construct analogies between the situation in Egypt and earlier flashpoints in history.   From the left, the Pakistani critic Tariq Ali suggested that “we witnessing…a wave of national-democratic […]

Travels with Vargas Llosa

January 31st, 2011|

Travels with Vargas Llosa

Last December, I found myself on a flight to Lima carrying a novel by Mario Vargas Llosa, the most recent winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature.  Between a young Peruvian woman with Asian features and myself sat a tall man in a leather jacket with olive skin and striking cheekbones.  He […]

The Spectre of Art & The Residual Encounter With The Real by George Elerick

January 26th, 2011|

Art has had a provocative relationship with society since its inception. In the ancient world, it began as a tool that centred a community around their expression of life which incorporated heterogeneous perspectives on cosmologies, deities and localized superheroes. Art has since been marginalized, perverted and pigeon-holed as an aesthetic device.

The Many Faces of Oliver Stone?: Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps and South of the Border

January 2nd, 2011|

Two films directed by Oliver Stone were released in 2010: Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (WS) and South of the Border (SB). Formally, the two films could not be more different: the first one is a fiction film, the sequel to Stone’s famous Wall Street (1987), while the second is a political documentary on contemporary […]